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The Krishna Key

The Krishna Key

Product Specifications
Language English
Binding Paperback
Publisher Westland Limited

Five thousand years ago, there came to earth a magical being called Krishna, who brought about innumerable miracles for the good of mankind. Humanity despaired of its fate if the Blue God were to die but was reassured that he would return in a fresh avatar when needed in the eventual Dark Age - the Kaliyug.

In modern times, a poor little rich boy grows up believing that he is that final avatar.

Only, he is a serial killer.

In this heart stopping tale, the arrival of a murderer who executes his gruesome and brilliantly thought-out schemes in the name of God is the first clue to a sinister conspiracy to expose an ancient secret - Krishna's priceless legacy to mankind.

Historian Ravi Mohan Saini must breathlessly dash from the submerged remains of Dwarka and the mysterious lingam of Somnath to the icy heights of Mount Kailash, in a quest to discover the cryptic location of Krishna's most prized possession. From the sand washed ruins of Kalibangan to a Vr ... See more

From the bestselling author of 'The Rozabal Line' and 'Chanakya's Chant' comes yet another exhaustively researched whopper of a plot, which provides an incredible alternative interpretation of the Vedic Age that will be relished by conspiracy buffs and thriller addicts alike.

Ashwin Sanghi and Amish Tripathi are considered to be the frontrunners in historical and mythological retelling. This book is part of that trend.

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Customer Reviews on The Krishna Key

  1. 5 star (211)
  2. 4 star (132)
  3. 3 star (60)
  4. 2 star (26)
  5. 1 star (13)
Overall Rating 4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Reviews
  1. 1 of 1 people found this review helpful
     Not Bad. Not Great. 27 December, 2012 On
    This is definitely not the first review of The Krishna Key that you have read. There are thousands out there - All you have to do is to "Google it"! And there is a reason for that - It is Good! But then how good is it depends entirely on you! Let me make it clear right at the start - It is not a book for everyone!

    Synopsis: (Spoiler-alert!)
    The protagonist is Ravi Mohan Saini, a historian who is accused of murdering his close friend over an ancient artifact which is eventually a part of the mythical "Philosopher's Stone". As expected, apart from the extremely smart cop who is hellbent on capturing him, there is another set of people who would go to any length to get their hands on the same object. The entire story revolves around how Saini can prove his innocence, outwit his enemies, and at the same time solve what has been baffling historians and conspiracy-theorists for centuries - What is the legacy that Krishna left behind for us?

    The parallel story (much like in Chanakya's Chant) is about Krishna telling his story in his point of view. The author was successful in linking Chanakya's story to that of Gangasagar Mishra in Chanakya's Chant, but failed to do that effectively in The Krishna Key!

    The Author:
    Ashwin is a changed man! He had no clue on how to structure the book in The Rozabal Line. This he mastered in Chanakya's Chant. But the numerous jokes and one-liners that he pulled out from email and SMS forwards in Chanakya's Chant made me cringe (although he did give due credit to each at the end of the book). But The Krishna Key is as fresh as Spring! He has set a style of his own and it is awesome. To say he has improved as an author is an understatement. He is Reborn! But despite trying really really hard not to compare, I still could not help thinking that he is highly influenced by Dan Brown.

    How could it have been Better:
    At too many places the book points an ugly finger at the beliefs of religions other than Hinduism. Could have been avoided or atleast a bit more subtle.
    Too much research, too much information - Again, depends on how you feel about it. I loved the book for how much research the author had done, but putting all that into one book was probably not that great an idea.
    Better proof-reading could have helped. Number of mixups with the names of the characters, facts, etc. He has acknowledged this on his website.

    Who Will Like It:
    Do you think that conspiracy theories are fun? Do you, if not love, atleast like a bit of our vedas/puranas, etc.? Do you like fast-paced stories that actually make you wanna flip the pages and find out what happens next? If the answers to these questions are YES, then this is definitely a book for you. Trust me, you will find yourself literally sitting on the edge of the seat as the story reaches the climax.

    Who Will NOT Like it:
    This book is a definite no for people who get easily offended on the basis of religion and for people who take things a bit too seriously. Think of it as a story and nothing more. It is fiction. And it is good fiction.

    My Rating:

    This is definitely a 3 out of 5:

    If you thought 3 is too high - I rated it 3 for the sheer dedication that the author has put in to do the required research to make a piece of fiction look like a documentary. And for the effort he has put in to connect all the dots in the end.

    If you thought 3 is too low - I rated it 3 due to the same reason. The author has tried to put in too much of his research into the book. We are constantly bombarded with numerous research findings and conspiracy theories and he had to rush through everything to make sure he did not leave any loose ends.

    The story is fast-paced and interesting, giving a fresh new look at our puranas. The characters are convincingly real. The language is simple enough and yet catchy. Good research has gone into it. And it has a perfect ending. I am really not sure why most of the feedback for this book says that the first half is great and the second half, not so much. I personally feel that there couldn't have been a better ending and the second half is equally thrilling. Ashwin has grown and flourished as an author and the maturity and confidence is evident. Loved it that he has given extensive details about all the places he has referred to (including YouTube video links) as a part of his research.

    Like I said at the start, this is not a book for everyone. It is for people who love to read just for the love of reading. If you expect too much before you start, you will be disappointed. So assume nothing - Just pick up the book and give it a shot - I am pretty sure you will not be disappointed!

    Happy Reading!
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  2.  Not any different from Ashwin's other books 2 April, 2013 On
    You may probably like the book, if you have not read any of Ashwin's work yet.

    As for me, I started off ('was impressed' would be a better phrase) with 'Chanakya's Chant' and then moved on to Krishna Key. To my dismay, I realized that it is the same concoction with no difference in the ingredients.

    Here are some things that put me off:

    - There are two stories going in parallel (one in present and one in past). In Krishna Key, I wasn't were sure about the significance of the story of Krishna. It just filled more pages in the book and put me to sleep. (Seen this style of narration already in Chanakya's chant)

    - Ashwin dwells excessively on Anagrams: Taarak Vakil -> Kalki Avatar is just a tip of the iceberg, you'll find anagrams strewn all over the book.

    - I think I'm reiterating the previous point, but the anagram (Abraham -> Brahama) appears in all his books. I'm not sure why Ashwin can't give up on this anagram. Pleeeeezz - we're bored of seeing this. Atleast, don't make the mistake of repeating this in any of your future works.

    - 'Love' between the two lead characters in the book pops out of nowhere. I mean - it sounds illogical that a cop, who has been chasing down the protagonist all this while suddenly falls for him (within a span of a day). Ashwin's definitely got something that bollywood is looking for!!

    - Towards the fag end of the book when both Ravi and Radhika are captured, why not just kill them right away - Sticking to the formula of letting the protagonist survive to annihilate his enemy is something we've all seen atleast a thousand times. Here again, Ashwin has followed the bandwagon, which already has bollywood on board, not to mention Mr. Jack Bauer from the TV flick, 24!
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  3.  Decent book for the historical mystery thriller reader 17 December, 2013 On
    The Krishna Key is the story of a modern day serial killer who, from his childhood, has been misled into believing that he is the reincarnation of Lord Krishna who has been born to get rid of evil. The story revolves around protagonist - a historian by the name of Ravi Mohan Saini who is trying to solve the mystery of the serial killings and try to discover the location of Lord Krishna's most prized possession - a material that can turn lead into gold. Through this journey, the author takes the reader through a fast paced journey through various places of religious and historic significance in India, and through Lord Krishna's ancient story.
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  4.  Awesome work by ashwin 17 November, 2013 On
    When I started reading this book, just couldn't stop myself from reading it in one go till the end.

    Excellent plot filled with suspense, adventure, thrill, chase to search the Krishna key.

    This book not only has suspense but also shares some spiritual knowledge with us. The phrase which I loved the most in this book is " I no what you seek my friend but remember one thing the philosopher is more important than the stone.

    Running short of words to describe the elegance of this outstanding work by Ashwin.

    A must read book, go for it, its worth your money.
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  5.  Good read for getting to know about Hindu Mythology 23 October, 2013 On
    I purchased this book while surfing for some other book. After having gone through the review I was curious to find out all about the storyline. Well, it is good in context of Indian mythology and how present is attached to past. You can make out that lot of research has gone behind this while writing...but alas it always reminds you of Dan Brown flow...But if you take that factor out of your mind you would learn a lot about various things..Go for it..
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  6.  Nice triller 19 February, 2014 On
    I love the way Ashwin Sanghi started the work.He mentioned everything in detail,so many new things to learn even though it is a fiction!!A detailed study about ancient India and the forbidden kingdoms,but still I feel it's ending was all of a sudden.From the start,he explained a lot about everything,but climax was like a switch it off kind!!!Nice work from a great author!!!Hats off to you! I became your fan!!!
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  7.  One of the nice book wriiten by the Author 13 February, 2014 On
    I bought this book sometimes back & like the idea of author. Sometime i felt like i am reading Indian DA vinchi Code. This is written it very nicely .

    Way to go...
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  8. 0 of 1 people found this review helpful
     Masterpiece:) 31 October, 2013 On
    I never expected that we've such a talent in India wrt our own history. I had goosebumps with the way the story was told and the facts which were unveiled in each of the sentences used in this novel. I never knew that India had such a rich heritage and with such an excellent work by Ashwin Sanghi Sir on this book with his exhaustive research made, I was awestruck.

    We've a competition for Dan Brown from India and this is for sure:)

    I bought this from and the delivery was super fast. Appreciate it Amazon:)
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